Even as a kid, I liked Z’s

When we were kids, we had the pleasure of playing with my dad’s slot cars. When he was young, they raced both large and small versions. I remember my dad telling us stories about racing those cars and about a red metal suitcase that stored them.
Since we had plenty of small track around, we’d lay out, and race those little cars around and around – getting really good at knowing when to temper that trigger around a corner and just letting it rip across the straightaway!

Of course, my brother and I would always choose our favorites. Mine was always this orange one…and if you asked me yesterday, I’d recall it as perhaps a Porsche 944 of sorts.

Well in the midst of my brother cleaning out the basement, tossing toys of yore, he found dad’s slot cars, and that orange one I favored so much…

Yep. It was a Datsun 240Z. Hot dang.

I guess it was such an awesome car back then, it just captured me and it’s stuck all these years. Thankfully, my brother kept the car, and dad gave it to me.  I’m just thankful my dad was able to expose us to all these cool things like slot cars. Mmm I wonder if my son Emerson would like to play slot cars someday…


October: a historic month, part 1

Ah! October. What a great month – leaves are turning, there a chill in the air, the sun is starting to get lazy in the morning and grumbles, “fall is here”! Well it’s also an important month for the Datsun Z.


Back in October 22nd, 1969, Nissan released one of its most successful cars ever: the Nissan Fairlady Z, or known as the Datsun 240z here in the States. Sold as a 1970 year model, it featured a 2.4L inline-6 engine and only cost $3,526 USD; a price on par with its contemporaries at the time: the MGB-GT (love that car) and the Porsche 914. In short, it was a success for its affordability, reliability, performance and great looks. 


The 240Z helped usher in a new perspective on Japanese sports cars to the American public, and continued its success of the S30 chassis with the 260z and 280z. And as they say, “the rest is history”…or just a link below 🙂

A few cool Datsun 240z ads:


Sources:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nissan_Z-car

Image: Wikimedia

Price: https://www.hemmings.com/magazine/hmn/2013/12/1970–73-Datsun-240Z/3733091.html


CL: free Z

Holy finds! Who doesn’t like scavenging around Craigslist?! What’s that saying: “One man’s junk is another man’s treasure”?! Oh the treasures!

Ready for this?! There’s a free Z on Craigslist! Whoa! A 1977 Datsun 280z was listed on CL in the free section (one of my favorite sections), without engine and transmission, mismatched wheels, multi-colored and a few dents, to say the least.

Get it while it’s hot.


Source:

http://sfbay.craigslist.org/eby/zip/5800159148.html


240z Rocket

Short post today – my cousin sent this over from Petrolicious. Love that site. You wanna spend your afternoon down the blissful car-enthusiast abyss?

Thought so. Start it off with this one:


Thanks Mike!


CL listing: Atara Watanabe replicas

A few months back I was overviewing 8-spoke wheels that have the classic look Watanabe wheels have oh-so craftily perfected (at least for a classic Japanese car, in my opinion).

During my frequent searches on Craigslist for all things Datsun, I saw someone in Burlingame selling their Ataras! $850 for 4 new 15×9, 0 offset…with Watanabe logo’d center caps? Haha nice.


mmm now I don’t have any driving experience on this wheel (and info on Atara in general is sparse), but for a replica wheel, it seems a bit steep. Though everything is relative: a single Wantabe wheel can go for that much.

Worth it?

Source – http://sfbay.craigslist.org/pen/pts/5778896264.html


Datsun: still in the media

Stopped by America’s Tire for one of our cars (i’m a big fan of their tire certificate), and behold on the wall is a poster for thanking customers. Check out the ZX.


Brake Lights just won’t STOP!

Took the Z out after a good while, and after parking I noticed the tail lights still on! Huh, it’s daytime and I don’t think I turned on the lights…

Maybe a fuse? A switch? Maybe the emergency brake switch… Oh, maybe the brake light switch on the brake pedal!

Then I found the breadcrumbs…

  
Ah little broken pieces, where do you come from…from what depths of Datsun dash do you petrified pieces of plastic purvey? 

This part looks about right judging from the clean ring of exposed metal…

  
So yesterday afternoon I’ve been parking it with a mail flyer wedged in there. But a quick trip to Home Depot did the job (I haven’t looked at the Datsun catalogs yet to reveal the REAL part). 

Picked up a simple metal hole plug, zinc plated, 3/8th inch – fits perfectly!

  
Make you think though – why even have a hole there? Why not just have the metal butt up against the switch? The switch itself is already on an adjustable screw, so it can’t be for micro adjustment reasons. But maybe it’s so that a cheaper part can be replaced instead of wearing out the switch with a hard piece of metal? I guess if the metal were wearing on the plastic trigger, eventually the trigger will break and the switch will need to be replaced. So instead, use an even cheaper replaceable part to wear out instead… 

What do you think?


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