Zpotted: Yellow 240z w/ rare adds

Here’s an interesting story: I spotted a 240z while flagging down a Corvair 95!

This guy was hummin’ along well over the speed limit in his blue Corvair 95 van, wheels tipped in – really punchin’ it!

Lol looking at the picture again – man, this says so much. You can see my speedometer..i’m going 40 and barely keeping up!

So I sought to flag him down to chat Corvair, and ended up at his driveway. Lo’n-behold, his neighbor owns a yellow Datsun 240z w/ some very interesting modifications i’ve never seen before! Check it:

You really get a Knight2000 vibe to it, yeah? You know when KITT goes into Super Pursuit mode? :]

First off, he’s got the Xenon body trim all the way around – left the rear black. Blacked out gas door and turbine styled wheels. Can’t really see it but also a stacked muffler like a Master Blaster. But what are those 2 items?! Is that a hatch spoiler? Are those white hatch vent covers?

Let’s work our way up: white hatch vent covers. I’ve never seen these! Usually, they’re slotted and chrome hatch vents, minimally raised from the hatch. These are clearly well pronounced comb-like covers made to force air down and out. Of course the ‘net doesn’t give much on these obscure guys!

Now check out that hatch spoiler! Again the internet lets us down! Though dark, it didn’t seem like it was home fabricated, so there’s got to be something out there on this! Anyone?

Zpotted: Orange 240z

Now I KNOW we’re living in the right neighborhood! Just a street down from my house I spot…

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What an example of a classic Datsun 240z! One of these days, I’ll head over there and we’ll get a chance to know more about this guy!

280z re-injected! The Z gets new fuel injectors

 [shit – found this old post from 9/20/15  in Drafts (yes, two years ago!) with a bunch of pics but no write up. Well, let’s do it then! You’ve got time for Daily Datsun, right? Thank you! Let’s read on!]

As you’ve guessed from the title, we’re replacing fuel injectors!

 

After purchasing a classic Z, or any old car for that matter, there’s always a list of things to inspect, test, and replace. After what’s now coming up on…3 years (oh my!), I’m finally diving into the engine – specifically, its ignition and fuel injection.

The injectors in this Z have always been unknown to me..well frankly because I didn’t take the time to inspect or get to understand them. They clearly look like they were replaced by the previous owner (Wild Bill’s brother), they worked, it ran, and that’s all I needed to know.

But whenever I looked at those electric signal connectors fastened by a wad of silicon glue, it always made me wonder what the heck was going on. Until now I’ve been in the ‘if it ain’t broke don’t fix it’ camp, but one day, I had the gumption to poke at it while the engine was running… Immediatly, the engine started choking, gasping for fuel. You know, it’s about time we give it love and clean these up!

Let’s get our hands dirty!

What you’ll need:

  1. 280z Fuel Injectors – I went with the FJ707 fuel injector from Standard Motor Products
  2. Fuel Injector signal trigger – (I don’t know the real name for this but that’s what I’m calling it…) Standard Motor Products SK25
  3. Long Philips screwdriver, PH1
  4. Razor blade
  5. Wirebrush
  6. Rag to catch the gas
  7. M5-.8, 30mm machine screws (optional)
  8. Easy-out (optional, but i highly recommend SpeedOut or Aisxle )
  9. Hammer (optional)
  10. About 1-1.5hrs

 

Remember those FJ707 fuel injectors I bought a while ago? (7/25/2015)

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Here’s what comes with the FJ707 fuel injector for the 280z:

Tip: Before diving into any project, it’s good to understand what’s the current state, or steady state – basically, what the heck is going on. I listened to how things ran, did a quick inspection of bolts, and made a mental note of where everything was (of course I made a digital “note” with camera too!). Are bolts rusted? What other parts are in and around the area that may need replacing? It really helps to visualize what you’ll be doing BEFORE you go and do it.

On with it!

Prepare to use a long Philips screwdriver to take out the screws holding in the fuel injectors. Or I suppose a right angled driver could work too. A long Philips will help get passed all the fuel rail business.

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I didn’t have the right angled Philips but this extension I had lying around did just the trick.

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Start by removing the screws that hold down the portion of the fuel rail above the injectors you’d like to replace.

Loosen up the hose clamps that connects the injector hose to the fuel rail. Getting the old injector hose off can be tricky. Just use a razor to cut a slit length wise where the hose meets the fuel rail. CAREFUL! Gas is going to leak out, so get that rag ready and handle it properly. You’ll notice that the fuel rail is separated into several sections. This is perfect because you won’t have to remove the whole thing to change the injectors out. I loosened one end of that sectional hose in the rail just to relieve stress and give the rail some flexibility. Now you can change 3 injectors at a time.

Note the silicon glue / electrical tape holding the injector’s signal trigger…

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I started with the set of three closest to the cabin. Of those three, it’s easiest to start disassembling from the cabin forward, and then when re-assembling, start with the one farthest from the cabin. It easier this way because the motion of the fuel rail as you’re working on each injector can pop off the assembly of the previous one…you’ll see.

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Here you’ll see the old injector on the left and new one installed on the right. When disassembling be sure to remember the sequence of parts and process.

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Here’s the old injector with flange, gasket, and seal (cut). The rubber seal maybe all worn out and stuck to the flange or injector. Just cut that sucker off. I also used a hammer to get the flange off of one of them. Light taps!

Use the wirebrush to cleanup the parts.

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The gasket was a bit out of shape when we pulled the assembly apart…

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Our buddy Christian working the metal gasket straight.

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Ugh stripped head. That’s what you get with a 38 year old bolt – rust and dust! I use the Speed Out easy out (Amazon) for all stripped heads – they’re amazing.

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Replaced it with a stainless M5-.8 bolt, 30mm long from Home Depot or Amazon. You’ll notice the head a touch larger, bolt a bit longer, but it works just fine. Make sure to pick up new lock washers while yer at it.

Reassemble everything and that’s it! I think you’ll know if the injector isn’t working properly – the Datsun’s engine is pretty transparent, you’ll notice the misfire.

Next up: Shocks? Bushings? Hey, how come in one picture I see some blue wire in the background?!

Act 2: welcome back!

sigh. life is great, huh? :]

Thanks to a comment from DJBlackrabbit, I found out my domain..THIS domain, DailyDatsun.com fell off the face of the earth. Though not set to auto-renew, it didn’t hit the internet trash bin (that would’ve been too easy) – no, DailyDatsun.com is popular enough that it got picked up by some Chinese / HK domain resale company. yep. I HAD TO BUY BACK MY OWN DOMAIN. wtf. 

Well. We did it. Let’s just say I didn’t lose any arms and legs…but it certainly put a new perspective on what’s going on here. We’ve really started something. Well, enough to get noticed, and put some real value on it. And now that we’re back up and running, it’s time to shift gears. We’ve burned out 1st long enough!

Welcome to a new Daily Datsun.

Summer is coming, and it’s time to take the car cover off.
Let’s see where the road takes us, and continue to enjoy the journey.

Cheers!

Justin

October: a historic month, part 1

Ah! October. What a great month – leaves are turning, there a chill in the air, the sun is starting to get lazy in the morning and grumbles, “fall is here”! Well it’s also an important month for the Datsun Z.


Back in October 22nd, 1969, Nissan released one of its most successful cars ever: the Nissan Fairlady Z, or known as the Datsun 240z here in the States. Sold as a 1970 year model, it featured a 2.4L inline-6 engine and only cost $3,526 USD; a price on par with its contemporaries at the time: the MGB-GT (love that car) and the Porsche 914. In short, it was a success for its affordability, reliability, performance and great looks. 


The 240Z helped usher in a new perspective on Japanese sports cars to the American public, and continued its success of the S30 chassis with the 260z and 280z. And as they say, “the rest is history”…or just a link below 🙂

A few cool Datsun 240z ads:


Sources:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nissan_Z-car

Image: Wikimedia

Price: https://www.hemmings.com/magazine/hmn/2013/12/1970–73-Datsun-240Z/3733091.html

CL: free Z

Holy finds! Who doesn’t like scavenging around Craigslist?! What’s that saying: “One man’s junk is another man’s treasure”?! Oh the treasures!

Ready for this?! There’s a free Z on Craigslist! Whoa! A 1977 Datsun 280z was listed on CL in the free section (one of my favorite sections), without engine and transmission, mismatched wheels, multi-colored and a few dents, to say the least.

Get it while it’s hot.


Source:

http://sfbay.craigslist.org/eby/zip/5800159148.html

240z Rocket

Short post today – my cousin sent this over from Petrolicious. Love that site. You wanna spend your afternoon down the blissful car-enthusiast abyss?

Thought so. Start it off with this one:


Thanks Mike!